Ragusa Rose

ragusa

Rosa ragusa[i]

 

Yeah, it’s the dead of winter here in New England. You know what I hate? The dead of winter here in New England. I could rant for hours, but I won’t. Instead, I’ll talk about something I like instead. I think everyone will agree that will be much better. For example: the beach in the summertime. That is much better. And of course, since this is my nature blog, something I commonly see at the beach, which would include the Ragusa rose. They are found at nearly all coastal beaches in the region, as well as many places inland,[ii] though they are less common away from the ocean.

These are actually an introduced species, brought to America from Asia in 1845.[iii] They were originally introduced to America to stabilize beach dunes.[iv] Apparently, beach erosion was a problem then too. And what happens when you bring an alien species to a new habitat? They quickly grow out of control and displace many native species, of course![v] They first appeared in the region in 1899, in Nantucket; and within 10 years they were found on beaches throughout the region.[vi] Goodbye native species!

The plant is a popular ornamental species, found in gardens in many countries.[vii] The Ragusa rose also hybridizes with other types of rose, helping create a wide variety of flowers, adding to its appeal to gardeners.[viii] Also adding to its appeal is that they require little care – they are hardy (to -35F) drought resistant and don’t need to be sprayed.[ix] They’ve also evolved to do well in poor soils.[x] It’s pretty much the perfect plant for New England gardens.

Also, the Ragusa rose has edible flowers and fruit.[xi] I have actually eaten the fruit, called a hip,[xii] and it is rather tart. My boss would probably like them, she loves tart things. As for the flowers, I have no idea what they taste like. Maybe I will try them out next time I’m at the beach. However, it is not too difficult to find recipes for them (as well as the hips) all over the internet. I’ll let you do the Google search, because I am too damned lazy.

rosehip1
Really, they don’t taste bad

Ragusa roses are medium size bushes that grow up to six feet tall.[xiii] They have very beautiful large flowers that are normally a purplish pinkish color that grow up to 3 inches across,[xiv] which bloom until the first killing frost.[xv] Their leaves can be quite large too, and like the flowers, they have an aroma.[xvi] The rose hips are bright red in color when ripe,[xvii] and look like kinda like small tomatoes.[xviii] Its stems are covered with fine thorns, protecting it from various herbivores.[xix] Just one more adaptation making this plant so invasive.

Yeah, almost five months away till I get to see these flowers on the beach again, and eat some rose hips (and flowers!).  Yeah, five long months! Bleh!

[i] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[ii] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[iii] Author Unknown “Rosa Ragusa” Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rugosa 12FEB2016

[iv] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[v] Author Unknown “Rosa Ragusa” Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rugosa 12FEB2016

[vi] Author Unknown “Rosa Ragusa” Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rugosa 12FEB2016

[vii] Author Unknown “Rosa Ragusa” Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rugosa 12FEB2016

[viii] Author Unknown “Rosa Ragusa” Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rugosa 12FEB2016

[ix] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[x] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[xi] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[xii] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[xiii] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[xiv] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[xv] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[xvi] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[xvii] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[xviii] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[xix] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

Ragusa Rose

Rosa ragusa[i]

 

Yeah, it’s the dead of winter here in New England. You know what I hate? The dead of winter here in New England. I could rant for hours, but I won’t. Instead, I’ll talk about something I like instead. I think everyone will agree that will be much better. For example: the beach in the summertime. That is much better. And of course, since this is my nature blog, something I commonly see at the beach, which would include the Ragusa rose. They are found at nearly all coastal beaches in the region, as well as many places inland,[ii] though they are less common away from the ocean.

These are actually an introduced species, brought to America from Asia in 1845.[iii] They were originally introduced to America to stabilize beach dunes.[iv] Apparently, beach erosion was a problem then too. And what happens when you bring an alien species to a new habitat? They quickly grow out of control and displace many native species, of course![v] They first appeared in the region in 1899, in Nantucket; and within 10 years they were found on beaches throughout the region.[vi] Goodbye native species!

The plant is a popular ornamental species, found in gardens in many countries.[vii] The Ragusa rose also hybridizes with other types of rose, helping create a wide variety of flowers, adding to its appeal to gardeners.[viii] Also adding to its appeal is that they require little care – they are hardy (to -35F) drought resistant and don’t need to be sprayed.[ix] They’ve also evolved to do well in poor soils.[x] It’s pretty much the perfect plant for New England gardens.

Also, the Ragusa rose has edible flowers and fruit.[xi] I have actually eaten the fruit, called a hip,[xii] and it is rather tart. My boss would probably like them, she loves tart things. As for the flowers, I have no idea what they taste like. Maybe I will try them out next time I’m at the beach. However, it is not too difficult to find recipes for them (as well as the hips) all over the internet. I’ll let you do the Google search, because I am too damned lazy.

Ragusa roses are medium size bushes that grow up to six feet tall.[xiii] They have very beautiful large flowers that are normally a purplish pinkish color that grow up to 3 inches across,[xiv] which bloom until the first killing frost.[xv] Their leaves can be quite large too, and like the flowers, they have an aroma.[xvi] The rose hips are bright red in color when ripe,[xvii] and look like kinda like small tomatoes.[xviii] Its stems are covered with fine thorns, protecting it from various herbivores.[xix] Just one more adaptation making this plant so invasive.

Yeah, almost five months away till I get to see these flowers on the beach again, and eat some rose hips (and flowers!).  Yeah, five long months! Bleh!

[i] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[ii] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[iii] Author Unknown “Rosa Ragusa” Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rugosa 12FEB2016

[iv] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[v] Author Unknown “Rosa Ragusa” Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rugosa 12FEB2016

[vi] Author Unknown “Rosa Ragusa” Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rugosa 12FEB2016

[vii] Author Unknown “Rosa Ragusa” Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rugosa 12FEB2016

[viii] Author Unknown “Rosa Ragusa” Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_rugosa 12FEB2016

[ix] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[x] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[xi] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[xii] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[xiii] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[xiv] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[xv] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[xvi] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[xvii] Theriet, John W. (revising author) Neiring, William, A. and Olmstead, Nancy C. “National Audubon Society Field Guild to Wildflowers” 2003. Chanticleer Press New York, pg. 755-6

[xviii] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

[xix] Dalziel, Chris “Grow Ragusa Roses for Food and Medicine” Joybilee Farm http://joybileefarm.com/rosa-rugosa/ 2017

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s